The Research Matrix

The other day I received an email from “Susan”, an alumna of the Columbia IKNS program whom I had the good fortune to work with as one of my students there. Susan’s question to me was on research, which that program touches upon but doesn’t cover in great depth, and in which I have lots of experience.

Susan’s client is exploring the feasibility of entering a new industrial services market related to energy.  Susan was looking to me for guidance about how to structure and price her research proposal to them.  For my purposes here, it doesn’t matter what the industry is — though I can say it’s B2B, and not one of those industries (like technology or health care) that is often in the news.

The value question

I prefer to demystify things wherever possible, so I proposed that Susan start by determining the client’s value question: What do they want to find out, and why (i.e., what do they plan to do with the answer)?  Susan had studied the KVC model at Columbia, so she knows how value is created from knowledge by making decisions and taking actions based on that knowledge — and that Planning (“Step 0”) starts at the top.

Columns A and B

Then I went into TV detective mode. Working down the chain:  what do we know, and what do we want to know?  We essentially have two columns, A for what we know, B for what we don’t know.  A is essentially our “value-relevant knowledge inventory”, and B is our “open to buy” knowledge purchase order.

Our mission

Simply put, our mission is to move things systematically from Column B to Column A.  That’s the essence of the research agenda, represented in the diagram by the orange arrow.

Except that it’s not often that simple.  (Bet you could see that coming.)  Knowledge users/clients are people, and people are essentially and eternally curious.  So Column B starts life as a set of Minimally Required Knowledge (MRK) to solve our business problem — our “need to know” items.  (Philosophers call this paring-down approach Occam’s Razor.)

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Meetings Will Make You — or Break You

Most of us work in virtual meetings often, some of us almost exclusively.  People call in using Google Hangouts, Skype, GoToMeeting, WebEx, JoinMe, Free Conference, and so on.  (I’m speaking here of “virtual meetings for the rest of us,” not the high-end meeting rooms costing hundreds of thousands.)

The hybrid meeting

I’ve been part of and/or hosted lots of physical meetings, and lots of online meetings.  In a meeting I hosted the other day, I encountered a variation — the digital-analog hybrid, where some of the people are remote and some are in the room.  (I’m in New York City, where everybody passes through at one time or another.)

It’s amazing what happens around the table that people on the phone do not have access to.  Off-mic side comments, glances, smiles, tones of voice — a panoply of meta-meaning that provides richness and context, and that only those physically in the room benefit from.

This led to a misunderstanding with one of my three co-presenting colleagues who was not present in the room.  I should mention that presence or absence had nothing to do with how important each person was to the meeting, nor how important the meeting was to each of them.  It was based simply on their availability to come to NYC at that time.  (Some were connected from as far away as Europe.)

The problem

For my purpose here, it’s not so important what exactly transpired.  Let’s just say it was a miscue deriving from an agenda item that was modified at show-time by consensus of those physically around the table — but not made clear — and here’s where as meeting leader I fell short — to those calling in. In other words, it was a problem enabled by the hybrid nature of the meeting.

What I’d like to share with you — because many of you may experience this too, with regard to meetings, or other conflicts with peers — is how we resolved it.

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