Piercing the Enterprise Bubble

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Harkness Tower, Yale

A few weeks ago I attended a reunion at my alma mater, Yale University.  As they always do, Yale offered up some of its most articulate faculty and administrators to describe the current state of affairs at the University.

The array of talent, initiative, and innovation on display was dazzling.  By the end of the two days, many of those of us who attended college decades ago were ready to sign up for another round — things have changed that much in the interim.

The Yale bubble

One surprisingly interesting session featured current administrators and faculty commenting on the current state of the University.  One dean mentioned what she calls the Yale bubble. It seems that students expect, and routinely receive, such high levels of performance from themselves and from the institution that they experience culture shock when they step outside its boundaries.

As one current student put it, “At Yale, it can be easy to get absorbed in our work, our activities, and friends. It can be easy to surround ourselves with a nice little Yale bubble.”  She goes on to describe how she and some of her friends broke out of that bubble to raise money for a disaster relief effort after a hurricane in the Philippines.

More recent events could be interpreted as showing the downside of the Yale bubble — a potential loss of balance and perspective as to what really matters.

Corporate culture — for better and for worse

Every enterprise creates its own nexus of practices, protocols, traditions, mythologies, and values — strands that together weave the fabric we call corporate culture. When you count over 300 years of history, $24 billion in the bank, and US presidents and other world leaders among your alumni, as Yale does, it’s easier than average to pull this off.

But every enterprise builds this cultural bubble, whether intentionally or not, and whether successfully or not.  It’s an essential part of what binds people to the enterprise — and thereby to each other — in collective pursuit of some common goal.

In some cases the enterprise bubble is “bubble-istic” — fluid, transparent, and porous.  It alternately expands and shrinks to fit new circumstances.  It is welcoming and inclusive.

In other cases, the enterprise bubble is made of steel and concrete.  It is hard, inflexible, exclusionary, and restrictive.  (North Korea might fit this model, for example.)

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    COMPETING IN THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY is written by Timothy Powell, an independent researcher and consultant in knowledge strategy. Tim is president of The Knowledge Agency® (TKA) and serves on the faculty of Columbia University's Information and Knowledge Strategy (IKNS) graduate program.

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